Thursday, May 19, 2011

Life isn't Conducive to a Blog


The title says it all.

Life isn't really conducive to a blog,
neither is farming, gardening, parenting,
equine rescue or homesteading in general. .  .

And yet,

In this age, it seems very important.

I cannot count the emails I receive that read
this blog and find it helpful, humorous or even inspiring.

So, that is why I am so disheartened that I have
taken so very long to write a new blog.

I finished up my Bachelor's Degree from
Marshall University this month, and it
was seven years in the making, so between
many horse rescues, farm disasters,
motherhood and life, I had not a second of
blog time to find.

So, here we are now. . .

Let the blogging begin anew. . .

Two weeks ago, we lost my Arabian mare, KD Lady Ann.
 She was a breathtakingly beautiful mare, and she was the
epitome of what I'd set out to purchase.

When my three siblings died in 2007, I decided to buy the
horse of my dreams in remembrance of them - something amazing
and alive that they would have understood as a symbol of life
and them.

She is now gone.

On the same day, before we knew anything about this tragedy,
and following on the heels of another event where we set up a booth,
took goats out and had a farm table at the 2011 Huntington, WV
Dogwood Festival,


We attended the Tractor Supply Company's Out There with Your Animals event.

We had a table, brought farm and rescue information, and we had a great day!

We talked to so many people, and we were so glad so many people
already knew who we were from visiting this blog or the website.


We have been very busy with rescue work, and a few days
after I lost my lovely mare, we went to Bruceton Mills to help
a woman who was going through a bitter divorce and very
afraid for the welfare of her well bred Arabian filly and mares.

I knew I had to help, and we made the very long drive up and
brought 3 of the 4 horses back down. One stayed behind with a friend
of mine in a foster situation.

As soon as I saw M.S. Dior, I was like, "WOW!" She was so much
like Lady Ann. Larger, of course, as the photos show, but she
looks so much like her. I was shocked. Here I'd come to do a good
deed, and I felt like it was I that was being helped.
I was able to save the life of a mare closely related to the mare I had just lost.


We then rescued three that had been seriously abused
and starved. This is a large breeder within the state of
WV.

A farm locally in Milton fostered and paid the
cost to save two of these lovely Arabs, Mia and Orian.

The other mare was in the poorest condition, and she is
also close to foaling.

Once all the babies leave on Monday, we will be milking full time our 4 does, twice a
day and wishing West Virginia did not think she had the right to tell
locals they cannot purchase milk from us or even buy
a share in our herd
to have access to local, kindly produced MILK!

It is always something here on the homestead.


Stay tuned! I will do my best to better stay on top of this and
make subjects more cohesive and more to the point!

Pray the life here on the homestead allows for this!



Pages

LUCAS FARM

Be thou diligent to know the state of thy flocks, and look well to thy herds. For riches are not for ever: and doth the crown endure to every generation? The hay appeareth, and the tender grass sheweth itself, and herbs of the mountains are gathered. The lambs are for thy clothing, and the goats are the price of the field. And thou shalt have goats' milk enough for thy food, for the food of thy household, and for the maintenance for thy maidens

- Proverbs 27:23-27




"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares."

- George Washington