Friday, January 31, 2014

Letting them go

It was very sad to see Gandy go today. Really, I was beyond partial to that charming boy! But this is how rescue works and a break down in that system results in other horses dying.

Had Gandalf not went to his home today, the little TWH colt would have had no where to go and likely would have perished, locked in a stall with no food or water. . .

So we let every single horse and pony that comes and steals our heart go to another home, a safe home, and we accept the next one and the next one and the next. . .

To steal the phrase from an awesome local dog rescue. . .

One by one . . . until one day (We hope) there are none left in need.

- Maybe written with some tears. I shall never tell. I'm tough, folks. Surely to do this, I must be.



Sunday, January 26, 2014

Buying livestock: Helpful tips



Please consider a few things before you dive head long into livestock purchases. . .

1st - consider the quality of the parentage of the animals you're buying. Grandparents aren't nearly as important as parents. Do not just take the seller's word. How does the animal stack up against good examples of the breed. No need for them to be comparable to the best of the best, if you're not hoping to attend national shows (which I'm not), but there is still a breed ideal the breeder should be striving for. That ideal EXISTS for a reason, and in livestock, it is often functional or historical to the breed. Important: If someone doesn't care to register and follow the guidelines of the organizations promoting the breed, consider why before you buy. Make sure the breeder is looking to use the animal for the purpose you're buying it for, as well. They will not usually breed to standards if they aren't using the animal for that function.

2nd - If you're not willing to register, maintain records, document histories and care about the quality of the animal or if your only care is what is cheap - again, huge red flag. The livestock world doesn't need more yahoos breeding anything. Look on craigslist. You will see this is true. Support people breeders looking to improve or maintain the breeds in a high quality fashion and aim to be that type of breeder.

3rd - Do not ever buy based on the color of a animal unless you're not buying because the animal is a color that disqualifies it from the breed standard. Flashy doesn't matter. Plain, simple. Flashy means nothing except uneducated buyers will buy those animals quicker. Is that the type of buyer you want to be and sell to? Spots, color, streaks, flash do not a quality animal make and does not a quality breeder create.

4th -  Buy and breed and promote suits your LANDS, your goals and your region's weather. This is smart and sustainable. Do you have pigs you want to forage and thrive? Have you checked hard and fast breed info to see what pigs really forages? Want to raise a dairy animals naturally, organically? Do you realize this usually equals dead goats in wet, warm areas? Be ready to breed and cull out animals that do not work on your farm - be it for health, personality, conformation or otherwise.

5th-  Learn as much about the breeds you chose before you buy. Don't just count on the seller. You have to do your part. I know a lot of people buy from lovely herds in awesome conditions. They don't do the raising right. They kill, say, a goat kid because they didn't feed properly on the bottle (happens SO often), didn't give selenium or copper or wouldn't worm correctly and they blame the breeder. If you saw animals in awesome shape on their farm, raised correctly and you see their animals are thriving year and year, you are likely the issue. Research, back to the drawing board, learn and correct the mistakes you made. Better yet, learn as much as possible beforehand, so you don't make as many mistakes once you commit and waste a lot of time and money.

Saturday, January 25, 2014

Fresh from the farm blizzard















A Winter Day on the Farm



Rescues rehabbing on the farm
Www.WVhorserescue.org




B E Z Heating and Cooling

http://www.bezheatingandcooling.com/

Please call: 304-928-4495

Basic Service Call Charge:  

$75 Service Call Fee

$60 per hour thereafter plus parts

State Sales Tax Applicable

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Fast, Professional
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License number: WV050615

Call 304-928-4495

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For Service Calls Any time

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

The water came from a whiskey barrel

You folks know how I love to tell a story. . .



The water came from a whiskey barrel

Water is a little more important to me than the average child of the USA born in the 80's.

Why I appreciate safe and consistent water access at age 33 as deeply as I do despite growing up in the time of the greatest conveniences known in history is a bit of a story, as you might have guessed it would prove to be.
Daddy was a man born in poor Appalachia in 1923. He grew up in a cabin with two rooms and a dirt floor. He was one of ten or twelve children. He is gone now, as all but one of them are, so to be honest, I cannot tell you right off exactly how many brothers and sisters he had or even quite where he fell in the birth order beyond near the middle maybe?

It was not uncommon for children of the day to contract and die of what we know today to be dysentery. It was known by Daddy as "The Bloody Flux." He was nearly lost as little boy to the infection. I remember so well how he would speak, always distantly and with such sadness, about the day his mother lost two of her very young children to the illness, which comes from poor sanitation most of the time. I remember hearing the term "Bloody Flux" and wondering what an awful and helpless a death this must have been. It Seems like one of the babies was named Charlie, and I believe another was called Coony. It has been too long since I heard the stories from my Daddy to tell you with certainty, though.

He did not care much for modern things. So I was born and brought home to a dwelling that had neither a well, cistern or public water.

Daddy had a whiskey barrel on the mountain that worked with gravity, and through the pipe he ran down the mountain, we would get water in the kitchen and bath. It would freeze in the winter as much of the pipe was exposed, it would run dry in the summer. . .when the barrel was new, the water would smell like Moonshine, though I had no idea what made it all smell so funny 30 years ago.

When it did run, it dribbled, when it didn't run at all, Daddy collected rain water and kept it in jugs outside the front door, and we went to the outhouse.

Oddly, we were not poor, he was the fellow who carried around enough to buy a new car in his pocket and never used credit, but it never seemed an important thing to him to have a modern water supply at this place. . .even through the time of his death in 2009.

I was about 6 years old when I moved away from our little trailer and whiskey water, and how quick I was to learn to appreciate good water pressure, somewhat consistent water. . .

Even when we moved. . .that water was from a well. Our wells were always full of Iron and smelled like rotten eggs whenever we moved. They turned brown hair brassy and blonde hair orange. It turned our white clothes yellow and our bath tub a deep rust, but man, it was almost always there, at least. . .

Well, sometimes the pump would go out -

Who am I kidding. . .IT went out a lot. . .but it was a step in the right direction. You learned to not buy whites. Black socks and blue towels it was!

One day, city water came through. I was about 14.

When I would go to my Daddy's store, back to where I first began, I would see the tens of gallons of water he carried in, though in his 70's then 80's, heating it in a huge pot on the gas stove, the same stove where, in the oven, he hatched Bantam chicks, turkeys and geese. He would carry it back to bathe in semi warm water in the winter. . .

In 2000, 2003, 2005, 2007. . .he caught it in rain barrels when he became too old to work on barrel and line coming from the mountain. . .

And it makes me wonder if one of those old wooden barrels is still up there. . . in pieces and helps me remember how very hard he worked to keep water coming to us all that time. . . in the way he knew best to do. . .

These days, I would say I had water without even giving it a thought, but I suspect after reading this you know I never have water without giving it. . .a second thought.

Plain Janes in rescue

It isn't that I'm not happy that certain breeds of animals are easy to place. Thank God some are sure fired easy placements. We need those! 



. .Many purebred animals and many unique, flashy mixes end up in horrific situations and OFTEN NEED rescue. 

Abuse and Neglect never discriminates on how an animal looks. Never. 

But when it comes to the good folks, the adopters, the rescuers. . .we do! 

It wears hard on one's soul to know how many loving animals die because they are black or non-descriptive. I wish I could pick up the black beagle/coon hound/terrier mix on the road and know a home will be found in a week flat . . .but homes usually aren't coming for such dogs. Heaven forbid we have a mousy colored horse without any white markings that is 14.1hh.

We know if we take certain animals - no adopter will ever come. What happens then? That is the place we are put too often as rescuers.

Hey, who am I to point a finger? While I have had my fair share of black cats, hound type black mutt dogs through the years and picked a plain Chestnut Quarter/Arab type for my first horse years ago. . . I have had and currently have my fair share of flashy pets and horses, too. Sure, every dog on my place was a rescue, was in need.. . .but 3 of the 5 are purebreds and neither of the well loved mutts are plain. It wasn't well thought out . . .pre-planned . . . but here they are. Pretty. Unique, at least.

We so often pick what catches the eye. . .in our home, in our vehicles, clothing, and in our pets.

I know that with breeds like the Golden Retriever from tonight, people are often looking for breed personality, too, but I have rarely met a black, hound mix mutt that wasn't friendly and loving. . .as much so as any Golden I've met. . .

But even I wondered if I wasn't petting the little Golden creature in my lap longer . .SURELY longer because she was special. . .she was a puppy 100 people emailed me for in a few hours promising a home of love and care forever. . .A Puppy I knew was going to find a home. She was a definite save.

While I share black puppies and brown dogs and black kittens in shelters that will die there with hardy a batting of the eye. . .I could place 1,000 Golden Puppies with little effort in a month.

While Chestnut Quarter Type horses with little white that are safe and sound could go unnoticed for months here in rescue, a Dappled Quarter Type comes through and whether sane or not, I'm flooded with inquiries.

I'm happy for the Dappled whatever, but I'm just sad for the bay plain jane.

I'm not writing this to point fingers any further than myself. . .

I know I do it, too. . .

I am a rescuer - I know WHAT people will adopt. I do not want it to be that way, but it simply is what it is.

I've listed nondescript cats and dogs and horses on petfinder. . .some have been on there for several years with never a single inquiry - through no fault of their own. . . they weren't pretty or unique enough. . . they were plain.

I don't expect this to change. And an animal in need is an animal in need - period. It isn't that I wish the flashy types weren't so easy to place, I just wish so many plain types could make it out safely or not wait for what seems like forever because everyone it waiting on the dappled, spotted, pointed, stripped, blue eyed whatchamacallit, including myself, folks. . .including myself here.

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Only Water?

As many of you know. . .West Virginia has experienced a chemical spill that poisoned the water sources for a HUGE number of the people living here (it has made it further and into Ky and Ohio now). I will say this. . .the ignorance of too many in our population was rarely made more clear to me than during this. . .

I cannot even count how many: "It's ONLY Water" posts I saw.

It is ONLY water? Ye...s, water. . .the single most important resource we take for granted...

Only water. . .shouldn't intelligent beings know better than to ever say..."Only Water?"

Oh, we. . .take . . . so . . . much for granted. . .assuming it will always be corrected for us, it will cause us no lasting trouble, no harm . . .

And we are sheep and so blind. . .

A WV RAW Milk website

www.rawmilkwv.com

www.wvherdshares.com

westvirginiarawmilk.blogspot.com

wvherdshares.wordpress.com

RAW Milk West Virginia Dairy Farm WV SB30 RAW MILK BILL Herd Share

7 years ago. . .

Jan 13, 2007



A Lifetime ago and yesterday, you know?

Seven years ago, I lost my younger sister and two little brothers. 

The fire and the rain and the fear and the trauma of that night and for weeks afterward are something there Is no sensible way to explain. . .

They were my entire life, the loves of my life. . .they helped define all that I was,
and they shaped my ideas of the future. How could someone with such a relationship ever doubt they knew this, but that is where I end up. . .

For the rest of my life, the fact they were here and are lost to me will define everything
I think and do. It some ways, it has left my being and life void and yet it has allowed life to have a lot of promise. . .and how that works, I do not even understand.

You never move beyond it, you can blink and be back there in an instant. . .and when you're alone, there is no way to escape it. . .so you find worthwhile things and never stop or be alone and go on. . .

And you're angry for no reason, and you're sad in the middle of happiness. . . and you cry when you shouldn't and can't when you should and try to sort it out.

Being at the base of a building in flames and knowing it is too late, you were too small,
too late, too late, too late. . .and they are there and you can never get to them. . .

Sometimes the overwhelming horror of what they thought in the last moment, the hope that
they knew If I could have gotten to them, well. . .enough of that.

You will forever recount the missteps, the wrong things you said or did through the time you had with someone. . .

I guess you work on forgiving yourself for any wrong word you might have spoken through the years with them and reassure yourself they knew you loved them desperately. . .

It is cliché, but there is no promise a single person you have will be there tomorrow and consider what you do and say.

There is no way to ever escape. . .but somehow, you can decide to not let it swallow you up, though to allow it to do so would be easy enough. . .

Never forgetting. . .

Many assume when they meet me, my husband's (thus my) last name is Lucas. 



Not so. . .Lucas is my maiden name. 

Why chose that name for a farm when my last name is now Creamer. . .makes it awkward for my husband. . . to be sure; he gets Mr. Lucas a lot.

So why?

I am girl of very tough skin. In person, very unemotional, witty, humor of every event and party. . .not one for hugs, for talking of love and fluff and feelings. . .but there are days that talking of what I feel is something I cannot, at least here, avoid. . .for it is why I do anything worthwhile you read about here, and to not tell you why I do it would catch me greatly amiss.

Today is why, this date every single year is why. . .
My sister's last name, my brothers' last name. My father's last name. . .
http://www.lucasfarmwv.com/ourfarmsname.html

They were here and so worthy of knowing, and everything I do, I hope, reflects back on their story, their lives. I can never accomplish all they could have done, and it will all be a paltry imitation. . .but as long as I let people know what drives anything decent I do. . .it is something, and they will never be forgotten. . .as long as I am here. . . and the times when I'm alone and beg to with them again and cannot be strong come a little less often these days as I am busy and busier and hope to be busier still until. . .surely someday, I see them again.


"For what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal"

-- 2 Corinthians 4:16-15:8 KJV

"We are confident, I say, and would prefer to be away from the body and at home with the Lord"

- 2 Corinthians 4:16-15:8 k.j.v.

Ben (19), Angel (17) and Quentin Lucas (14) - Until we meet again, darlings. . .until we meet again (1/13/07)

(My sister is pictured with our father (85) who died on June 5th, 2009, just a little over two years after my brothers and sister were lost)






Rebel's new home

Meet Rebel. 

He needed a family. . .
My son needed him. . .

I will not write of details as my 12 year old does see these posts and reliving it is quite painful for him. . .

But we recently and VERY unexpectedly lost our very loved Dachshund rescue, Oscar.

I asked my son if he wanted to search for another Doxie in rescue, but he said having another like Oscar would bother him too much.

I spotted a listing about a Boston Terrier who was 5 years old on Craigslist. No cost beyond having him neutered as his 83 year old owner had just passed away a week before and the neighbour was trying to find him a loving home. The elderly man's family seemed to not care about giving their father's pet a home.

The little guy was still living the in the kitchen of his former owner's home. . .

He completely shut down.

We thought he was deaf for the first week. No response to any noise. ZERO. Afraid to walk, eat and waiting faithfully by the door. . . waiting for us to take him home to his master. . .someone he clearly missed.

I thought. . .this poor guy will never work in this loud, Crazy house. These kids are too much. . .he will never recover from his loss in this place. . .

But then. . .a few days ago, he came to life. . .suddenly, he was active, happy, playful and CLEARLY hears everything.

Here is to hoping he never had to suffer losing another owner again.



Sunday, January 12, 2014

1/13/2007

http://www.lucasfarmwv.com/ourfarmsname.html

Jan 13, 2007

A Lifetime ago and yesterday, you know?

Seven years ago, I lost my younger sister and two little brother. 

The fire and the rain and the fear and the trauma of that night and for weeks afterward are something there Is no sensible way to explain. . .

They were my entire life, the loves of my life. . .they helped define all that I was,
and they shaped my ideas of the future. How could someone with such a relationship ever doubt they knew this, but that is where I end up. . .

For the rest of my life, the fact they were here and are lost to me will define everything
I think and do. It some ways, it has left my being and life void and yet it has allowed life to have a lot of promise. . .and how that works, I do not even understand.

You never move beyond it, you can blink and be back there in an instant. . .and when you're alone, there is no way to escape it. . .so you find worthwhile things and never stop or be alone and go on. . .

And you're angry for no reason, and you're sad in the middle of happiness. . . and you cry when you shouldn't and can't when you should and try to sort it out.

Being at the base of a building in flames and knowing it is too late, you were too small,
too late, too late, too late. . .and they are there and you can never get to them. . .

Sometimes the overwhelming horror of what they thought in the last moment, the hope that
they knew If I could have gotten to them, well. . .enough of that.

You will forever recount the missteps, the wrong things you said or did through the time you had with someone. . .

I guess you work on forgiving yourself for any wrong word you might have spoken through the years with them and reassure yourself they knew you loved them desperately. . .

It is cliché, but there is no promise a single person you have will be there tomorrow and consider what you do and say.

There is no way to ever escape. . .but somehow, you can decide to now let it swallow you up, though to allow it to do so would be easy enough. . .

Friday, January 10, 2014

Milk?

Just some helpful info I've compiled: 

You Pay What for eggs?




I shared a post earlier on the facebook page, you can see the image above, and it questioned how Americans daily pay upwards of $5 for fancy coffee drinks but refuse to pay sustainable farmers a decent price for their good - eggs, the post used as an example, at $5 a carton. Two people chimed in - one says that chickens are something anyone can have and get an egg a day from, another said they wouldn't pay the $5 for either.

My response:

Just "Anyone" cannot buy and raise a chicken in the USA and raise it properly - that is why most people buy factory farmed eggs - and they want sustainable farmers to charge the $2 a carton like the filthy factories charge. Outrageous. It is unfathomable to me anyone would even defend such a thing by saying coffee takes more to process, so is worth more. No. Sorry - hens must be raise to 4-6 months of age before they lay, 50% are males. The hens, even if raised free range, need supplemented feed that is hardly inexpensive, especially if organic or non-gmo. The hen will not lay an egg a day if she is a heritage breed animal and not kept under artificial lighting. The cost to feed the hen and care for the hen in a humane way is worth $5 a dozen for the 12 eggs she produces - Ask someone who does the chicken raising correctly - $3 a dozen may break one even in feed costs for a flock is broken down for a 12 month period. MIGHT. What makes you think anyone should get a product that doesn't even cover a farmer's time or allow profit? Therein lies the AMERICAN illusion and expectation of something for nothing. It is a VERY sad and common philosophy. People will pay $5 for a refined, corn syrup filled coffee drink made with factory farmed and GMO filled products at a coffee shop and balk at paying a sustainable farmer a decent price for a good product. Sad, to say the very least.

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

Worth Fighting for: A West Virginia Raw Milk Battle



Second, some hard facts:
http://online.wsj.com/article/PR-CO-20130611-909875.html?mod=wsj_share_facebook


A Worth the While Fight – Tinia Creamer
Whether you want to use real, raw milk or not is not the issue. The issue is do you believe American Citizens... WV citizens… have the right to make food choices? Do you believe citizens have the right to co-own livestock and use their animals' products?

Raw milk is a safe food when handled properly (like all other foods) but that is not the issue. Yes, it has been used for thousands of years. Our grandparents and great grandparents, people much healthier than we, know from experience raw milk is safe.

But can it become, like produce, meats and pasteurized dairy products, contaminated as well?

Sure. Any food source or water source can.

The CDC's own data has proven raw milk is a low risk food. We consume high risk foods each day that the government makes no attempts to outlaw - produce like spinach and tomatoes, meats, and seafood – all of which are higher risks foods than raw milk.

Think of the raw foods sold all over the state, served openly in restaurants, such as raw oysters, raw fish in sushi, steak served tar-tar, rare hamburger, eggs served over easy. All we see is a warning label telling us we consume this at our own risk. Our right to do so isn't circumvented.

When it comes to milk, it is.

Why?

This isn't a safety issue. This IS A FREEDOM ISSUE.

When citizens are not free to use a naturally occurring food source that has been used in civilized societies all over the world for thousands of years, there is a Freedom problem.

Our government allows (sad that we must speak in those terms) our citizens access to tobacco. Alcohol. Pharmaceuticals over the counter, known to cause side effects and death. But WV's government says we, the citizens, aren't to be trusted with milk the FDA and AG Dept hasn't had a hand in.

Beyond that, WV is the only state that feels it has the power to tell the citizens that we cannot co-own a dairy animal herd and use our animals' products. If you want to co-own Jersey cows with me, fine, but you cannot co-own AND use the milk from your cow or the goats we both own.



You cannot give the milk away. If it means saving the life of a calf that needs colostrum, you cannot give it away. If it means allowing soap makers access to a local, humanely produced milk product for their milk soap, you cannot give it away.

This boils down to NOT BEING ALLOWED to bypass the FDA and Dept of Agriculture. You are not able to cut ties with the hand they have in your milk.

How is that freedom? You are not allowed to have milk unless they approve your choice in milk and have a hand in the process. How long before this applies to many other aspects of the small farm community? If you believe only in local milk that is unpasteurized, you are simply out of luck.

How can the state of West Virginia tell us we cannot enter into a legally binding contract with someone and share a herd of cows? How do I have rights a man who doesn't have land to keep a dairy animal does NOT? I have land, and so I am allowed by the state to use milk from my own cow. No one else. Based on current law, not even my family living here can use it. If you aren't lucky enough to have the land or time, you are denied a right I have. . .

Whether you want to use raw milk or milk of any kind is not the issue. Whether you believe raw milk is safer than factory farmed pasteurized milk is not the issue. The issue is do you believe citizens have the right to make a decision about their diets on their own without government interference? Do you believe we have the right to co-own livestock and use our animals’ products?

This is a Control issue, folks. This is about having control over the consumers. This is about pushing BIG Agriculture over the small, sustainable farms of WV. This is robbing hundreds of thousands of dollars of income from struggling farmers right here in WV.



This is not Mountaineers are always free. Mountaineers have the most restrictive laws on this issue in the entire USA. This is not freedom. And this is not something of which West Virginia can be proud.


A great point point about health and safety:
http://www.realmilk.com/safety/real-milk-powerpoint/

RAW Milk West Virginia Dairy Farm WV SB30 RAW MILK BILL Herd Share

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

A cold Winter with Farm Cats and Dogs Means. . ."If You are Cold..."

Each winter, the posts begin about bringing all CATS and ALL DOGS indoors during the cold days ahead. The farmer who leaves his working dog outside "working" is demonized. 

One wonders what these folks think of the goats, sheep, horses and cattle outside? To be hair, the working dogs and cats (barn mousers) after have it far easier given their ability to get into warmer spots with coats that are even more winter ready than any goat I've seen.

 Are we farmers doing the cows and horses harm by not bringing them inside, as well?



Doesn't the statement: "If You are Cold, THEY ARE Cold," apply to all?
(I'm in jest, folks)
(I'm in jest, folks)

If you have a dog or cat that isn't typically outdoors, that is another matter. They should not be left out as they are ill equipped if they are accustomed to being in certain temps. Further, You should never have a dog tied out in any weather and leave them to try to survive.


If you have a pet that genetically isn't a type kept outside at all in the past decades - i.e. small breeds like Chihuahuas, breeds genetically not suited to harsh winter based on their historical genetic background or those disadvantages in some way (age, illness), I believe they thrive best inside with temperatures that are mild/moderate when weather is A-typical for what they are genetically prepared to live through.

The genetic package truly isn't there for some breeds - it takes generations to breed something in or out. . .

But for many breeds of dogs - the genetics ARE there for outdoor living when they are well nourished and given solid options for shelter, just like it is there for goats, cattle, poultry, pigs and more. . .

I have to assume many people are just truly unaware when they post some of the things I'm seeing. It really makes no sense to leave one's livestock out in a barn or on pasture (which is perfectly acceptable with wind breaks, shelter to stay dry and water/food) and say a double coated working Pyrenees that comes from generations (as many do, especially those actively working on a farm) of working dogs that has grown a coat for winter through the seasonal changes their coats have and is acclimatized to cold temps (from decades or FAR, FAR MORE in genetic history) should be brought in when his flock is outside. The flock he protects.


You have issues if you take an inside dog and put them out in the middle of winter. You would have problems if you brought goats up from Florida in December and threw them out in the winters of the north, yes. You also be off track if you take a dog who grew a coat for winter through outdoor living in the fall and you bring him into a house that 75 degrees.


Common sense, folks. 

DON'T DO those things. . .

If a healthy animal's genetic package works with the outdoors and the animal is acclimatized - you are not doing them a disservice by providing appropriate food and shelter verses bringing them in to temps far higher than they are used to in winter, No more than your sheep and goats guarded by the said dog are being dealt a disservice, for instance.

Now, if a person wants to do this - that is a personal choice, but it is neither kinder or more sensible.

My Pyr has three options for shelter - a covered porch where it is dry with a bedding area, a huge dog house with straw and a covered opening. . . and a barn full of hay. . .

And just where do I often find him in the worst of weather? Laying in the driveway and rolling around playing with the other farm dogs. . .because that is WHAT dogs that have acclimatized coats, breeding and so forth think of cold weather. . .

Where were the horses in snow, rain and wind? Well, not in the barn with hay - they are found poking around on the hillside in the wind. . .

Your acclimated farming dogs, just like your livestock, should have access to windbreaks, shelter, bedding, plenty of food and unfrozen water -

They will be fine.

We can all sigh with relief now.

Pages

LUCAS FARM

Be thou diligent to know the state of thy flocks, and look well to thy herds. For riches are not for ever: and doth the crown endure to every generation? The hay appeareth, and the tender grass sheweth itself, and herbs of the mountains are gathered. The lambs are for thy clothing, and the goats are the price of the field. And thou shalt have goats' milk enough for thy food, for the food of thy household, and for the maintenance for thy maidens

- Proverbs 27:23-27




"I know of no pursuit in which more real and important services can be rendered to any country than by improving its agriculture, its breed of useful animals, and other branches of a husbandman's cares."

- George Washington